uispeccoll:

itscolossal:

Motion Silhouette: An Interactive Shadow Picture Book

Astonishing & clever book art. uispeccoll:

itscolossal:

Motion Silhouette: An Interactive Shadow Picture Book

Astonishing & clever book art. uispeccoll:

itscolossal:

Motion Silhouette: An Interactive Shadow Picture Book

Astonishing & clever book art. uispeccoll:

itscolossal:

Motion Silhouette: An Interactive Shadow Picture Book

Astonishing & clever book art. uispeccoll:

itscolossal:

Motion Silhouette: An Interactive Shadow Picture Book

Astonishing & clever book art.

amospoe:

“Imagine an eye unruled by man-made laws of perspective, an eye unprejudiced by compositional logic, an eye which does not respond to the name of everything but which must know each object encountered in life through an adventure of perception. How many colors are there in a field of grass to the crawling baby unaware of ‘Green’? How many rainbows can light create for the untutored eye? How aware of variations in heat waves can that eye be? Imagine a world alive with incomprehensible objects and shimmering with an endless variety of movement and innumerable gradations of color. Imagine a world before the ‘beginning was the word.” 
― Stan Brakhage

invisiblestories:

Johann Zahn (via)
“Poetry, like the imagination itself, must be limitless. And there must be other ways of expressing the inexpressible, which is what—poetry is just that. Prose is about what can be said and what is known and so on. Poetry is about what cannot be expressed. I mean, terrible grief, or intense erotic feeling, or even unspeakable anger are all inexpressible. You can’t put them in words and that’s why you try to put them in words. Because that’s all you’ve got.”

theparisreview:

Happy birthday to the poet Susan Howe, who is seventy-seven today. Check out her eerie collaborations with the musician David Grubbs.

magictransistor:

Alchemisten: A first view of Practical Chemistry.
magictransistor:

Alchemisten: A first view of Practical Chemistry.
magictransistor:

Alchemisten: A first view of Practical Chemistry.

magictransistor:

Alchemisten: A first view of Practical Chemistry.

(via othmeralia)

“What does it mean to study (as opposed to simply read) literature, and why would one be paid to do it? A more pointed way of asking the question is this: What do we, as readers, have to gain from someone who studies literature for a living? There are many ways of answering that question: here is ours. We look to the literary scholar to tell us what is in, and at stake in, a work of literature. As someone who is presumed to have spent a long time with it, and therefore to have achieved an insight, born from experience, into its inner workings, the literary scholar is midwife to the literary work. “You speak from inside the poem as someone looking to see how the roof articulates with the walls and how the wall articulates with the floor,” says Helen Vendler about the activity of criticism. “And where are the crossbeams that hold it up, and where are the windows that let light through?””
hippolytehentgen:

détails “Documents 1”
collages et dessins sur documents
Hippolyte Hentgen hippolytehentgen:

détails “Documents 1”
collages et dessins sur documents
Hippolyte Hentgen hippolytehentgen:

détails “Documents 1”
collages et dessins sur documents
Hippolyte Hentgen hippolytehentgen:

détails “Documents 1”
collages et dessins sur documents
Hippolyte Hentgen hippolytehentgen:

détails “Documents 1”
collages et dessins sur documents
Hippolyte Hentgen

hippolytehentgen:

détails “Documents 1”

collages et dessins sur documents

Hippolyte Hentgen

(via 50watts)

nataliekaythatcher:

Charles-Albert Reichen, Erik Nitsche. A History of Physics. The New Illustrated Library of Science and Invention, Vol. 8. Hawthorn Books, NY. First Edition, 1963. A remarkable piece of book design by the renowned modernist designer Erik Nitsche. The book is profusely illustrated throughout illuminating the story of physics with historical etchings and 60’s saturated colour plates.

(via 50watts)

muspeccoll:

Inspired by uispeccoll, houghtonlib, smithsonianlibraries, and others, we’ve created our first animated gifs! 
These images are from Fragments on the theory and practice of landscape gardening by Humphry Repton (London, 1816).  Repton was England’s first professional landscape gardener, a term he coined himself. Repton and other gardeners of this period sought to shape the landscape without the outward appearance of control, creating “natural” scenery too perfect to exist in nature. 
Repton’s main employment was as a design consultant for wealthy landowners throughout the English countryside, and he used his artistic and writing skills to further his career. When he sketched plans for new landscapes, Repton devised a way to make the illustrations interact with his clients by incorporating overlays which, when closed, show the current state of the property.  The client could lift the flaps to see how his or her estate would look after Repton’s proposed modifications. 
Although Repton took on hundreds of commissions during his thirty-year career, his writings and watercolors may be his most enduring achievements.  His illustrations, along with his written commentary and explanations of his design principles, were collected and published as Observations on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening (1803) and Fragments on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening (1816). 
MERLIN catalog record muspeccoll:

Inspired by uispeccoll, houghtonlib, smithsonianlibraries, and others, we’ve created our first animated gifs! 
These images are from Fragments on the theory and practice of landscape gardening by Humphry Repton (London, 1816).  Repton was England’s first professional landscape gardener, a term he coined himself. Repton and other gardeners of this period sought to shape the landscape without the outward appearance of control, creating “natural” scenery too perfect to exist in nature. 
Repton’s main employment was as a design consultant for wealthy landowners throughout the English countryside, and he used his artistic and writing skills to further his career. When he sketched plans for new landscapes, Repton devised a way to make the illustrations interact with his clients by incorporating overlays which, when closed, show the current state of the property.  The client could lift the flaps to see how his or her estate would look after Repton’s proposed modifications. 
Although Repton took on hundreds of commissions during his thirty-year career, his writings and watercolors may be his most enduring achievements.  His illustrations, along with his written commentary and explanations of his design principles, were collected and published as Observations on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening (1803) and Fragments on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening (1816). 
MERLIN catalog record muspeccoll:

Inspired by uispeccoll, houghtonlib, smithsonianlibraries, and others, we’ve created our first animated gifs! 
These images are from Fragments on the theory and practice of landscape gardening by Humphry Repton (London, 1816).  Repton was England’s first professional landscape gardener, a term he coined himself. Repton and other gardeners of this period sought to shape the landscape without the outward appearance of control, creating “natural” scenery too perfect to exist in nature. 
Repton’s main employment was as a design consultant for wealthy landowners throughout the English countryside, and he used his artistic and writing skills to further his career. When he sketched plans for new landscapes, Repton devised a way to make the illustrations interact with his clients by incorporating overlays which, when closed, show the current state of the property.  The client could lift the flaps to see how his or her estate would look after Repton’s proposed modifications. 
Although Repton took on hundreds of commissions during his thirty-year career, his writings and watercolors may be his most enduring achievements.  His illustrations, along with his written commentary and explanations of his design principles, were collected and published as Observations on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening (1803) and Fragments on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening (1816). 
MERLIN catalog record

muspeccoll:

Inspired by uispeccoll, houghtonlib, smithsonianlibraries, and others, we’ve created our first animated gifs! 

These images are from Fragments on the theory and practice of landscape gardening by Humphry Repton (London, 1816).  Repton was England’s first professional landscape gardener, a term he coined himself. Repton and other gardeners of this period sought to shape the landscape without the outward appearance of control, creating “natural” scenery too perfect to exist in nature. 

Repton’s main employment was as a design consultant for wealthy landowners throughout the English countryside, and he used his artistic and writing skills to further his career. When he sketched plans for new landscapes, Repton devised a way to make the illustrations interact with his clients by incorporating overlays which, when closed, show the current state of the property.  The client could lift the flaps to see how his or her estate would look after Repton’s proposed modifications. 

Although Repton took on hundreds of commissions during his thirty-year career, his writings and watercolors may be his most enduring achievements.  His illustrations, along with his written commentary and explanations of his design principles, were collected and published as Observations on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening (1803) and Fragments on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening (1816). 

MERLIN catalog record

(via houghtonlib)

magictransistor:

Automated reading device using microfilms, circa 1935:

"The future of the book has quite a few failed predictions in its wake. From Thomas Edison’s belief that books of the future would be printed on leaves of nickel, to a 1959 prediction that the text of a book would be projected on the ceiling of your home, no one knew for sure what was in store for the printed word.

"The April, 1935 issue of Everyday Science and Mechanics included this nifty invention which was to be the next logical step in the world of publishing. Basically a microfilm reader mounted on a large pole, the media device was supposed to let you sit back in your favorite chair while reading your latest tome of choice…” [more]

(via othmeralia)

houghtonlib:

Tagliacozzi, Gaspare, 1545-1599. De curtorum chirurgia per insitionem, 1599.
Typ 525.97.820
Houghton Library, Harvard University
16th century surgeon Gaspare Tagliacozzi was particularly known for his skill in the method of reconstructing an amputated nose by grafting a flap of skin from the patient’s arm. The patient would have to spend three weeks with the arm immobilized in this position for the graft to take.
houghtonlib:

Tagliacozzi, Gaspare, 1545-1599. De curtorum chirurgia per insitionem, 1599.
Typ 525.97.820
Houghton Library, Harvard University
16th century surgeon Gaspare Tagliacozzi was particularly known for his skill in the method of reconstructing an amputated nose by grafting a flap of skin from the patient’s arm. The patient would have to spend three weeks with the arm immobilized in this position for the graft to take.

houghtonlib:

Tagliacozzi, Gaspare, 1545-1599. De curtorum chirurgia per insitionem, 1599.

Typ 525.97.820

Houghton Library, Harvard University

16th century surgeon Gaspare Tagliacozzi was particularly known for his skill in the method of reconstructing an amputated nose by grafting a flap of skin from the patient’s arm. The patient would have to spend three weeks with the arm immobilized in this position for the graft to take.

(via 50watts)

"Thought-Forms, a strange, beguiling, frequently pretentious, utterly original book first published in 1901, emerged from this ferment of late-Victorian mysticism. It was written by Annie Besant and Charles Leadbeater, erstwhile members of the London Theosophical Society alongside Yeats, and it features a stunning sequence of images that illustrate the book’s central argument: emotions, sounds, ideas and events manifest as visual auras."

(via Victorian Occultism and the Art of Synesthesia | The Public Domain Review)

Jacobus Vrel // Woman at a Window, Waving at a Girl // c1654

(via Biblioklept)