nataliekaythatcher:

Charles-Albert Reichen, Erik Nitsche. A History of Physics. The New Illustrated Library of Science and Invention, Vol. 8. Hawthorn Books, NY. First Edition, 1963. A remarkable piece of book design by the renowned modernist designer Erik Nitsche. The book is profusely illustrated throughout illuminating the story of physics with historical etchings and 60’s saturated colour plates.

(via 50watts)

muspeccoll:

Inspired by uispeccoll, houghtonlib, smithsonianlibraries, and others, we’ve created our first animated gifs! 
These images are from Fragments on the theory and practice of landscape gardening by Humphry Repton (London, 1816).  Repton was England’s first professional landscape gardener, a term he coined himself. Repton and other gardeners of this period sought to shape the landscape without the outward appearance of control, creating “natural” scenery too perfect to exist in nature. 
Repton’s main employment was as a design consultant for wealthy landowners throughout the English countryside, and he used his artistic and writing skills to further his career. When he sketched plans for new landscapes, Repton devised a way to make the illustrations interact with his clients by incorporating overlays which, when closed, show the current state of the property.  The client could lift the flaps to see how his or her estate would look after Repton’s proposed modifications. 
Although Repton took on hundreds of commissions during his thirty-year career, his writings and watercolors may be his most enduring achievements.  His illustrations, along with his written commentary and explanations of his design principles, were collected and published as Observations on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening (1803) and Fragments on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening (1816). 
MERLIN catalog record muspeccoll:

Inspired by uispeccoll, houghtonlib, smithsonianlibraries, and others, we’ve created our first animated gifs! 
These images are from Fragments on the theory and practice of landscape gardening by Humphry Repton (London, 1816).  Repton was England’s first professional landscape gardener, a term he coined himself. Repton and other gardeners of this period sought to shape the landscape without the outward appearance of control, creating “natural” scenery too perfect to exist in nature. 
Repton’s main employment was as a design consultant for wealthy landowners throughout the English countryside, and he used his artistic and writing skills to further his career. When he sketched plans for new landscapes, Repton devised a way to make the illustrations interact with his clients by incorporating overlays which, when closed, show the current state of the property.  The client could lift the flaps to see how his or her estate would look after Repton’s proposed modifications. 
Although Repton took on hundreds of commissions during his thirty-year career, his writings and watercolors may be his most enduring achievements.  His illustrations, along with his written commentary and explanations of his design principles, were collected and published as Observations on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening (1803) and Fragments on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening (1816). 
MERLIN catalog record muspeccoll:

Inspired by uispeccoll, houghtonlib, smithsonianlibraries, and others, we’ve created our first animated gifs! 
These images are from Fragments on the theory and practice of landscape gardening by Humphry Repton (London, 1816).  Repton was England’s first professional landscape gardener, a term he coined himself. Repton and other gardeners of this period sought to shape the landscape without the outward appearance of control, creating “natural” scenery too perfect to exist in nature. 
Repton’s main employment was as a design consultant for wealthy landowners throughout the English countryside, and he used his artistic and writing skills to further his career. When he sketched plans for new landscapes, Repton devised a way to make the illustrations interact with his clients by incorporating overlays which, when closed, show the current state of the property.  The client could lift the flaps to see how his or her estate would look after Repton’s proposed modifications. 
Although Repton took on hundreds of commissions during his thirty-year career, his writings and watercolors may be his most enduring achievements.  His illustrations, along with his written commentary and explanations of his design principles, were collected and published as Observations on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening (1803) and Fragments on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening (1816). 
MERLIN catalog record

muspeccoll:

Inspired by uispeccoll, houghtonlib, smithsonianlibraries, and others, we’ve created our first animated gifs! 

These images are from Fragments on the theory and practice of landscape gardening by Humphry Repton (London, 1816).  Repton was England’s first professional landscape gardener, a term he coined himself. Repton and other gardeners of this period sought to shape the landscape without the outward appearance of control, creating “natural” scenery too perfect to exist in nature. 

Repton’s main employment was as a design consultant for wealthy landowners throughout the English countryside, and he used his artistic and writing skills to further his career. When he sketched plans for new landscapes, Repton devised a way to make the illustrations interact with his clients by incorporating overlays which, when closed, show the current state of the property.  The client could lift the flaps to see how his or her estate would look after Repton’s proposed modifications. 

Although Repton took on hundreds of commissions during his thirty-year career, his writings and watercolors may be his most enduring achievements.  His illustrations, along with his written commentary and explanations of his design principles, were collected and published as Observations on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening (1803) and Fragments on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening (1816). 

MERLIN catalog record

(via houghtonlib)

magictransistor:

Automated reading device using microfilms, circa 1935:

"The future of the book has quite a few failed predictions in its wake. From Thomas Edison’s belief that books of the future would be printed on leaves of nickel, to a 1959 prediction that the text of a book would be projected on the ceiling of your home, no one knew for sure what was in store for the printed word.

"The April, 1935 issue of Everyday Science and Mechanics included this nifty invention which was to be the next logical step in the world of publishing. Basically a microfilm reader mounted on a large pole, the media device was supposed to let you sit back in your favorite chair while reading your latest tome of choice…” [more]

(via othmeralia)

houghtonlib:

Tagliacozzi, Gaspare, 1545-1599. De curtorum chirurgia per insitionem, 1599.
Typ 525.97.820
Houghton Library, Harvard University
16th century surgeon Gaspare Tagliacozzi was particularly known for his skill in the method of reconstructing an amputated nose by grafting a flap of skin from the patient’s arm. The patient would have to spend three weeks with the arm immobilized in this position for the graft to take.
houghtonlib:

Tagliacozzi, Gaspare, 1545-1599. De curtorum chirurgia per insitionem, 1599.
Typ 525.97.820
Houghton Library, Harvard University
16th century surgeon Gaspare Tagliacozzi was particularly known for his skill in the method of reconstructing an amputated nose by grafting a flap of skin from the patient’s arm. The patient would have to spend three weeks with the arm immobilized in this position for the graft to take.

houghtonlib:

Tagliacozzi, Gaspare, 1545-1599. De curtorum chirurgia per insitionem, 1599.

Typ 525.97.820

Houghton Library, Harvard University

16th century surgeon Gaspare Tagliacozzi was particularly known for his skill in the method of reconstructing an amputated nose by grafting a flap of skin from the patient’s arm. The patient would have to spend three weeks with the arm immobilized in this position for the graft to take.

(via 50watts)

"Thought-Forms, a strange, beguiling, frequently pretentious, utterly original book first published in 1901, emerged from this ferment of late-Victorian mysticism. It was written by Annie Besant and Charles Leadbeater, erstwhile members of the London Theosophical Society alongside Yeats, and it features a stunning sequence of images that illustrate the book’s central argument: emotions, sounds, ideas and events manifest as visual auras."

(via Victorian Occultism and the Art of Synesthesia | The Public Domain Review)

Jacobus Vrel // Woman at a Window, Waving at a Girl // c1654

(via Biblioklept)

Dr. Arthur E. Durham // Palate of the Cellar Slug // ca. 1880 // Albumen Silver Print Microphotograph

(via FAMSF)

blackpaint20:

Untitled (Death and Young Woman) by Otto Schubert

19th cent

Youmg woman at left with arms raised, dropping a dagger, at right is death wearing see through clothes and holding up his hand, set within a forest scene

(via vonmurr)

Joseph Michael Gandy // An imagined view of the Bank of England in ruins // 1830

(via Soane’s London › The Bank Of England)

Fascinating sound map with field recordings of London’s canals and rivers.

(via Soundmap of London canals and minor rivers)

“Feeds like @HistoryinPics make it impossible for anyone interested in a picture to find out more about it, to better understand what it is showing, and to assess its accuracy. As a teacher and as someone who works in a cultural heritage institution, I am deeply invested in the value of studying the past and of recognizing that the past is never neutral or transparent. We see the past through our own perspective and often put it to use for our own purposes. We don’t always need to trace history’s contours in order to enjoy a letter or a photograph, but they are there to be traced. These accounts capitalize on a notion that history is nothing more than superficial glimpses of some vaguely defined time before ours, one that exists for us to look at and exclaim over and move on from without worrying about what it means and whether it happened.”

Holly Herndon, in an interview with Rhizome:

The idea was to try to try and represent the hard cuts and sharp transitions between environments in online browsing. This is executed most obviously with themusique concrète technique at the beginning and middle of the track, but I’ve also embedded a lot in the composition as a whole. In the production on the voice, I would cut my words off and interrupt myself with hard edits and then sing over those lines, which creates an unusual vocal effect, almost as if one of the voices is struggling through a Skype connection while the other completes the phrase. I also think that the marriage of styles happening throughout the track is pretty reflective of the new coherence I find with disparate sound sources running on my computer at any given time.

Emily Thompson (History, Princeton) has a project on Vectors, an online journal, that collects archival sound recordings from New York City streets circa 1930. Titled “The Roaring Twenties: an interactive exploration into the soundscape of New York City”, the site features locations of sounds, noise complaints, and film recordings grouped with associated documents and overlaid onto a Google map to help orient the sounds both historically and spatially. There is also an excellent bibliography well worth diving into if one is interested in the history of listening.

Guy Maddin  //  Night Mayor (2009)